Thursday, January 5, 2012

The boat that George bought


This is the boat George bought.

This is the pump
That lay in the boat George bought
















This is the crack
That was in the pump
That lay in the boat George bought
















This is the spray
That came from the crack
That was in the pump
That lay in the boat George bought















This is the filter
That was rusted by spray
That came from the crack
That was in the pump
That lay in the boat George bought
















This is the gas
That leaked from the filter
That was rusted by spray
That came from the crack
That was in the pump
That lay in the boat George bought
















This is the Installer all forlorn
That cleaned up the gas all alone
That leaked from the filter
That was rusted by spray
That came from the crack
That was in the pump
That lay in the boat George bought
















Something south of fifty gallons of gas siphoned out of the tank and into the bilge when the filter rusted through. The bilge pump removed the leaking gas from the boat while it was on a lift, until the battery finally expired leaving a few gallons of gas left in the bilge. George was most surprised when he got on the boat, smelled gas, opened the transom hatch, and then saw the gas. I got a very excited call. The remaining gas had water and dish washing liquid added to it, and it was pumped out. Several big flushes with much water and soap removed most, but not all of the odor. Some of the gas may have gotten forward, and a little bit probably soaked into the foam, but it's no longer a hazard. 

The seawater spraying from the crack in the bait well pump when it ran ruined almost everything, and what wasn't damaged by the water, the gas took care of. A new bilge pump, (I don't trust the one that pumped all of the gas, although it still ran), float switch, filter assembly, saltwater wash down pump, and of course the bait well pump are all on the grocery list. I think a better quality filter assembly should be used, and mounted much higher up on the transom, so the magic siphon trick can't happen again.

My thanks to Ma Goose, and Jack for allowing me to use their material. I will send the royalty check forthwith.

7 comments:

  1. Might want to check the anti-siphon valve in the gas tank as well, cause clearly it is inoperative....

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very clever - great use of words and technique. When I steal this Mother Goose idea some day, I won't credit you, but I'll think of you!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks kids, it was fun to write.

    And for above, do you mean the anti-siphon valve the manufacturer never installed, and would require cutting a hole to the deck to do so?

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is the mushroom cloud
    That came from the inferno
    That was sparked by the pump
    That ignited the gas
    That leaked from the filter
    That was rusted by spray
    That came from the crack
    That was in the pump
    That lay in the boat George bought

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very funny, thanks for the additional verses

    ReplyDelete
  6. And where is the 50 gallons of gas- in the bay or in the veggie patch?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Unfortunately no one was around when the filter let loose, and the bilge pump did pump the gas into the ICW. The tank had been filled earlier, and that's how we know about how much fuel got away.

    ReplyDelete